Disorderly Conduct and Public Intoxication

Disorderly conduct (also called “disturbing the peace”) is a crime that usually involves some kind of offensive or disruptive public activity. Criminal statutes in some states include public intoxication as one kind of behavior that can be considered disorderly conduct. In other states, public intoxication is a separate criminal offense, while in still other jurisdictions the criminal codes might include a crime called “drunk and disorderly” conduct. This article discusses disorderly conduct and public intoxication crimes, whatever they might be called where you live.

Its worth noting that alcohol is often a factor in the commission of many other crimes not discussed here. Estimates are that alcohol or drug abuse plays a significant role in the commission of at least a third of all serious crimes, including domestic violence and many assault crimes. Other crimes where alcohol is a key factor include DUI or DWI and minor in possession or underage drinking offenses.

What is Disorderly Conduct?

Disorderly conduct laws allow police officers to arrest people whose public behavior is disruptive or offensive or whose actions interfere with other peoples enjoyment of public spaces — often because of the offenders use of alcohol or drugs. But remember that in many states, a criminal charge of disorderly conduct does not require the offenderÕs use of alcohol. Any kind of disruptive conduct — including loitering, fighting, being unreasonably noisy, and otherwise disturbing the peace– can fall under the definition of disorderly conduct depending on how the crime is defined in the states criminal statutes.

Disorderly Conduct State Law Example: California

To get an idea of the kind of behavior that might be covered under disorderly conduct statutes, check out this excerpt from California’s Penal Code (Section 647), which defines the crime of disorderly conduct in California:

647. Every person who commits any of the following acts is guilty of disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor:

(a) Who solicits anyone to engage in or who engages in lewd or dissolute conduct in any public place or in any place open to the public or exposed to public view.

(b) Who solicits or who agrees to engage in or who engages in any act of prostitution…

(c) Who accosts other persons in any public place or in any place open to the public for the purpose of begging or soliciting alms.

(d) Who loiters in or about any toilet open to the public for the purpose of engaging in or soliciting any lewd or lascivious or any unlawful act.

(e) Who lodges in any building, structure, vehicle, or place, whether public or private, without the permission of the owner or person entitled to the possession or in control of it.

(f) Who is found in any public place under the influence of intoxicating liquor, any drug, controlled substance, toluene, or any combination of any intoxicating liquor, drug, controlled substance, or toluene, in a condition that he or she is unable to exercise care for his or her own safety or the safety of others, or by reason of his or her being under the influence of intoxicating liquor, any drug, controlled substance, toluene, or any combination of any intoxicating liquor, drug, or toluene, interferes with or obstructs or prevents the free use of any street, sidewalk, or other public way.